Libraries

Libraries

The Big Ten Academic Alliance Library Initiatives focus on three objectives--optimizing student and faculty access to the combined resources of our libraries; maximizing cost, time, and space savings; and supporting a collaborative environment where library staff can work together to solve their mutual problems.

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BTAA Critical Pedagogy Symposium
The BTAA Critical Pedagogy Team will host a half-day online event to explore challenges and strategies for both integrating anti-racist practices into instructional settings and developing collective action around anti-racist instructional practices.
big ten open books
Big Ten Open Books
Big Ten Open Books connects readers everywhere to fully accessible, trusted books from leading university presses. Established as a new model for open-access publishing focused on equity and inclusion, we invite you to explore our Gender and Sexuality studies collection.
BIG Collection: Resource Access Policy Harmonization Report
The Resource Access Policy Harmonization pilot team is pleased to share their final report. Aspirational in nature, the report includes the new BTAA Resource Sharing Agreement plus Scanning Standards; reaffirms the Principles and Protocols for Sharing Special Collections within the Big Ten; and articulates important next steps for future pilot projects and working group investigations.

Library News


CIC's Armstrong Presents at EDUCAUSE 2009

Nov 13, 2009, 12:36 PM

Kimberly Armstrong, assistant director of the CIC’s Center for Library Initiatives, delivered a talk at the 2009 EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in Denver on Nov. 4. Armstrong’s presentation focused on how collaboration may help solve “the scholarly communication problem." Scholars and...

Kimberly Armstrong, assistant director of the CIC’s Center for Library Initiatives, delivered a talk at the 2009 EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in Denver on Nov. 4. Armstrong’s presentation focused on how collaboration may help solve “the scholarly communication problem."

Scholars and researchers publish articles in journals both to share their work and to participate in the promotion and tenure reward structure, and libraries in turn, must buy back that published scholarship in the form of subscriptions, increasingly in digital form. The cost of journal subscriptions has long outpaced library budgets and the effect is that less scholarship is available to fewer people.

But if academic libraries consolidated their purchasing power, pooled their resources, and approached publishers collectively, Armstrong presented, the results could be transformational for both higher education and the public good as the end result would be more scholarship being available to more people.

Armstrong delivered her presentation with Jay Starratt, dean of libraries at Washington State University. The EDUCAUSE Annual Conference is the higher education community’s premier information technology event.